History in July is the Professional Historians of NSW & ACT’s traditional mid-winter get together. Held in the wonderful rooms of History House, History in July is a chance for PHA members and history and heritage industry colleagues to network, keep up with the latest work in the field and catch up over a glass of wine and a light meal.

This year’s special guest will be Mark Tedeschi, AM, QC, Senior Crown Prosecutor for New South Wales. Over the last 35 years he has prosecuted many of the most prominent criminal trials in the state. He is the head of Chambers of the New South Wales Crown Prosecutors and the President of the Australian Association of Crown Prosecutors. He is a visiting Professor at the University of Wollongong, a Director on the Board of the National Art School, and a Trustee of Sydney Grammar School. In 2013 he was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia.

Mark has had numerous articles published on criminal law, environmental law, social welfare law, commercial law, history and genealogy. He has written a legal textbook on the law of international trade, and three true-crime books which have been published by Simon & Schuster Australia. They are: ‘Eugenia: a true story of adversity, tragedy, crime and courage’, published in 2012; ‘Kidnapped: the crime that shocked the nation’ published in 2015; and ’Murder at Myall Creek: the trial that defined a nation’. ‘Eugenia’ was shortlisted in 2013 as a finalist in the Australian Book Industry Awards and the Australian Crime Writers Association Ned Kelly Awards. Mark will talk about his three books and the process of approaching historical crimes from a legal point of view.

The 2016 Public History Prize will also be awarded on the evening, which is an annual prize awarded to a student engaged with the field and practice of public history.

When: Wednesday 19 July 2017, 6:00-9:00pm.
Where: History House, 133 Macquarie Street, Sydney.
Cost: $10 at the door – register online.
Contact: phanswsecretary@gmail.com

Image: View of Macquarie Place, Sydney, 185-?, courtesy the State Library of New South Wales.

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